Welcome to Blacktown Business Access

 fb yt Instagramlogo

Mithila Zaheen. Mithila Zaheen.
18 July 2021 Posted by 

Mathila’s upholding the family traditions of medicine and volunteering

DALLAS SHERRINGHAM
BLACKTOWN Hospital junior doctor Mithila Zaheen is passionate about her work, but she also has challenges far beyond the busy days caring for her patients.
Mithila has a passion for health equality, with a particular interest in improving access for rural, Indigenous and refugee communities.
 
She volunteers extensively including for a refugee tutoring service for the Sudanese communities, the homework club at Baabayn Aboriginal Corporation and with The Water Well and Share the Dignity programs.
 
Mithila is eager to give back to her profession in many ways. She has been appointed a Conjoint Associate Lecturer at Western Sydney University School of Medicine and is currently studying a postgraduate Master of Medicine in Clinical Epidemiology at the University of Sydney.
 
So, Mithila is certainly not afraid of a challenge and her hard work was recognised recently with an International Women’s Day honor.
 
Mithila was named a ‘Blacktown City Woman of the Year’ finalist at the council’s annual International Women’s Day breakfast. 
 
Humbled and honored
 
She said she was “humbled and honored” to be recognised alongside 21 other women who have made significant contributions to the local community.
 
Despite her challenging work and study load, Mithila makes time for her many volunteer commitments. 
 
“I make it a priority to give back. It helps me feel fulfilled when I make a difference for the wider community,” Mithila said.
 
“I grew up in western Sydney and my parents are migrants from Bangladesh so I’m passionate about helping underserved populations, especially Indigenous and migrant communities.
 
“I’m especially passionate about health literacy. It’s one thing to help people in hospital but it’s even more fulfilling when you can educate people to advocate for themselves and their health. Especially with COVID-19, there’s so much fear and misinformation that I feel a responsibility to help educate the community.”
 
She’s just started her basic physician training at Blacktown Hospital, and is considering specialising in cardiology or respiratory disease down the track – while staying focused on helping western Sydney.
 
It’s no surprise Mithila comes from a medical background. Her parents are both doctors, her older brother, Dr Fardin Ferdous, is a fellow junior doctor at Blacktown Hospital and her younger sister is also studying medicine.
 
“My brother and I did our whole internship together, which was really nice. It’s great to have support and someone to debrief with,” Mithila said.
 
Sources: Western Health The Pulse, Blacktown City Council


editor

Publisher
Michael Walls
michael@accessnews.com.au
0407 783 413

Login to post comments

Blacktown News covers the business and community issues of the NSW Blacktown region. Blacktown News is a prime media source for connecting with the pulse of the region and tapping into it's vast opportunities.